Sunday, April 28, 2013

Grandma Marion



 Early Saturday morning, my 90-year-old Grandma Marion passed away.
My first thought was how proud of her I was.
She did it!
She lived this mortal life with beauty, perseverance, and grace!
As you may or may not know, her husband tragically
 was killed in an airplane crash when her youngest child
was just a few months old.  She had eight children to take care of- alone.
She was optimistic and cheerful.
She blessed the lives of those around her.  
I know her reunion with her husband was sweet and tender.
And LONG coming!!! 
I wish I could have seen it. 

This photo is of my Grandma and her children.
  My dad is standing next to her, he is the oldest.
My heart is sad for my dad, who has been through a lot with her.
He so wanted her to be around when he returned from his mission in Missouri.
But life happens, and it was her time to
 peacefully slip from this life to the next.
And we all know and take comfort in the sweet peace and knowledge that we will
one day see Grandma Marion again.
As my sweet cousin Mike said to me in a note:
"Heaven just got a bit more colorful, shiny, and perfume-y!
A marriage is happily reunited after a long time"

So true!
In 2004, my cousin Jayne sat down with Grandma and talked to her about her life.
She compiled it in a beautiful book with photos, too.
It is such a treasure to have.  It's grandma's thoughts on life, 
and how she kept moving despite trials and disappointments.
She was incredible, and I have gained so much perspective 
through my trials reading from it.
Tonight I double-checked my children in their beds and found the
 200-page memoir in Jane's fingers- sound asleep.
{Jane is named after Grandma Marion's mother; Jane Bee}.
 She almost finished the entire book- and all just today!
She's been laughing and re-telling me funny stories about her all day.
Grandma really was an amazing woman.

I am so sad I will miss her funeral as Mr. Nielson and
I are headed to Europe on Wednesday with the Nielson family.
 I love you, Grandma Marion.

 * * * * * * * * * *